All posts in Fleets

Source: Environmental Leader Green Fleets online

Atlas Auto Crushers solved its waste oil problem and became compliant with EPA regulations by installing an oil-recovery system to reduce the amount of oil in its waste water, according to a case study.

Oil Skimmers, the company that produced the oil recovery system, published the case study.

Atlas Auto Crushers says when it crushes junkers and strips them of their parts, despite removing oil from the engine, residual oil use to still leak and spread onto its lot, creating environmental concerns. In auto recycling, collecting and disposing hazardous waste is a major challenge and the EPA closely monitors industrial activity for environmental compliance.
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Source: Environmental

The EPA has proposed new standards for both cars and fuels that will help reduce pollution and improve efficiency in vehicles.

The EPA’s new standard proposal for cars and gasoline will aid in achieving lower pollution at the lowest cost. By decreasing the amount of emissions caused by motor vehicles and their fuel, the standard can help prevent up to 2,400 premature deaths and 23,000 cases of respiratory illnesses in children per year.
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Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels

For a century, almost all light-duty vehicles (LDVs) have been powered by internal combustion engines (ICEs) operating on petroleum fuels. Energy security concerns over petroleum imports and the effect of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions on global climate are driving interest in alternatives. This report assesses the potential for reducing petroleum consumption and GHG emissions by 80% across the U.S. LDV fleet by 2050, relative to 2005. It examines the current capability and estimated future performance and costs for each vehicle type and non-petroleum-based fuel technology as options that could significantly contribute to these goals. By analyzing scenarios that combine various fuel and vehicle pathways, the report also identifies barriers to implementation of these technologies and suggests policies to achieve the desired reductions. Several scenarios are promising, but strong, effective, and sustained but adaptive policies such as research and development (R&D), subsidies, energy taxes, or regulations will be necessary to overcome barriers such as cost and consumer choice.

Source: By John Kemp

(Reuters) – U.S. distributors and freight hauliers have held down diesel consumption even as their business recovers from recession by making thousands of small changes to their operations.

Improved driver training, restrictions on idling and careful route planning to reduce deadheads (where vehicles travel empty) are all reducing consumption of expensive diesel while helping companies promote their green credentials.

“In 2011, we achieved almost 69 percent improvement in fleet efficiency over our 2005 baseline,” Wal-Mart boasted in its 2012 Global Responsibility Report. “We delivered 65 million more cases, while driving 28 million fewer miles, by increasing our pallets per trailer and better managing our routes.”

“Our network efficiency improvement equates to avoiding nearly 41,000 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent to taking 7,900 cars off the road,” the company wrote.
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By ,  Source: Guide

Range is increasingly becoming a non-issue with EVs as this latest story from alternative energy company Silex Power attests. On the tiny island nation of Malta, Silex Power is quietly developing a luxury EV it claims will blow all other EVs out of the water when it comes to miles-per-charge. That includes the Tesla Model S’s incredible 265-mile-per-charge title.

Called the Chreos, Silex is announcing the vehicle will go an unbelievable 621 miles between charges. While you are chewing on that, let me tell you the other astounding claim: it takes only 10 minutes to charge.

This super EV makes use of a proprietary system Silex refers to as hypercharging, and owners will have the chance to plug the Chreos into a high-voltage charging station–you guessed it–developed specifically to accommodate the car’s speedy charge.

Compare the hypercharge to Tesla’s system for the Model S, which the company calls supercharging. The latter takes over an hour to charge, however.

Source: Lori Weaver, Guide

It’s probably hard for detractors of electric vehicles to believe, but reports are that California is beginning to experience a shortage of EV charging stations in public parking garages like those found at malls. With only a few charging stations available and many more electric and plug-in hybrid cars parked in these garages, the need for additional infrastructure is becoming evident, at least on the West Coast.

But it isn’t as though we already aren’t seeing a lot of infrastructure growth. In the last year, the number of charging stations took a 130% jump over the number of public stations available the previous year. In fact, over the past five years, there has been an average increase of about 90% each year, according to PA Consulting Group.

Regulatory incentives by both the federal government as well as local entities for installing public charging stations have helped give a boost to on-the-go powering up potential. No doubt the drop in average cost of a station–from around $10,000 to only about $2,000 (excluding installation, which varies)–has had a dramatic influence as well.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing the 2013 percentage standards for four fuel categories that are part of the agency’s Renewable Fuel Standard program (RFS2).

The proposal announced today will be open for a 45-day public comment period and EPA will consider feedback from a range of stakeholders before the proposal is finalized. EPA continues to support the use of renewable fuels within the transportation sector through the RFS2 program, which encourages innovation, strengthens American energy security, and decreases greenhouse gas pollution.

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) established the RFS2 program and the annual renewable fuel volume targets, which steadily increase to an overall level of 36 billion gallons in 2022. To achieve these volumes, EPA calculates a percentage-based standard for the following year. Based on the standard, each refiner and importer determines the minimum volume of renewable fuel that it must ensure is used in its transportation fuel.

The proposed 2013 overall volumes and standards are:

Biomass-based diesel (1.28 billion gallons; 1.12 percent)
Advanced biofuels (2.75 billion gallons; 1.60 percent)
Cellulosic biofuels (14 million gallons; 0.008 percent)
Total renewable fuels (16.55 billion gallons; 9.63 percent)

Overall, EPA’s RFS2 program encourages greater use of renewable fuels, including advanced biofuels. For 2013, the program is proposing to implement EISA’s requirement to blend more than 1.35 billion gallons of renewable fuels over the amount mandated for 2012.

More information on the standards and regulations:

More information on renewable fuels:

Source: Environmental

A study of major companies including Boots, Morrisons and Network Rail has found that companies switching to electric or plug-in vehicles could reduce their fleet fuel costs by 75 percent.

The report by the Plugged-In Fleets Initiative, a joint effort of the Energy Saving Trust, EDF Energy and Route Monkey, studied the potential savings 20 companies could make by deploying plug-in vehicles such as electric and plug-in hybrids. Participants included Schneider Electric, the London Fire Brigade, Surrey County Council, Southwark Council, Ryden Group, Tristar Chauffeurs, the University of Cumbria, Urban Planters, and York City Council.

“Plugged-In Fleets Initiative: Charging Forward”  found companies that operate vehicles with mileage below 80 miles per day would find that all-electric vehicles meet their needs on a single overnight charge.
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General Electric Co. (GE)’s commitment to buy 25,000 electric autos, promoted as the largest ever when it was announced more than two years ago, is taking a detour.

The obstacle: Customers of GE’s corporate fleet-services unit wanted more options, said Deb Frodl, the division’s chief strategy officer. So GE has included natural gas-powered pickups and propane-fueled vehicles among about 11,000 autos — mostly plug-in hybrids and electric cars — already acquired from makers including Ford Motor Co. (F) and General Motors Co. (GM)

The shift at GE, whose 2010 pledge was hailed as a catalyst for bulk buying of electric vehicles, shows how businesses are struggling to balance greater fuel efficiency and reduced emissions against higher sticker prices, limited range and lingering doubts about still-infant technology.
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