News

Sherwin-Williams Announces Fourth Quarter Training Courses

Source: Body Shop Business.com

Sherwin-Williams Automotive Finishes has announced its latest courses and training sites for the fourth quarter (October through December), 2013.

Participants will learn through a combination of classroom, digital and hands-on settings at various metropolitan Sherwin-Williams Automotive Finishes training centers. Training is available to all shop owners, managers, painters and technicians.

According to Rod Habel, director of training operations for Sherwin-Williams, many of the new classes directly relate to the Sherwin-Williams philosophy of helping its customers through “lean thinking” – introducing concepts that support sustainable practices, which increases productivity while minimizing or often eliminating waste.

In particular, Habel noted that there will also be considerable curriculum emphasis on the company’s breakthrough AWX Performance Plus waterborne coatings technology as well as its ATX refinish system.

A key sampling of courses also offered during the fourth quarter includes:

  • Color Adjustment and Blending
  • Estimating Solutions for Profit
  • Achieving Service Excellence
  • Express Scratch Repair Service
  • Painter Certification

Further details regarding the 2013 fourth quarter schedule for training centers, dates, specific course descriptions, and locations are listed here.


New Pesticide Labels Will Better Protect Bees and Other Pollinators

US EPA, WASHINGTON – In an ongoing effort to protect bees and other pollinators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed new pesticide labels that prohibit use of some neonicotinoid pesticide products where bees are present.

“Multiple factors play a role in bee colony declines, including pesticides. The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action to protect bees from pesticide exposure and these label changes will further our efforts,” said Jim Jones, assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The new labels will have a bee advisory box and icon with information on routes of exposure and spray drift precautions. Today’s announcement affects products containing the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin and thiamethoxam. The EPA will work with pesticide manufacturers to change labels so that they will meet the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) safety standard.

In May, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and EPA released a comprehensive scientific report on honey bee health, showing scientific consensus that there are a complex set of stressors associated with honey bee declines, including loss of habitat, parasites and disease, genetics, poor nutrition and pesticide exposure.

The agency continues to work with beekeepers, growers, pesticide applicators, pesticide and seed companies, and federal and state agencies to reduce pesticide drift dust and advance best management practices. The EPA recently released new enforcement guidance to federal, state and tribal enforcement officials to enhance investigations of beekill incidents.

More on the EPA’s label changes and pollinator protection efforts: http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/ecosystem/pollinator/index.html

View the infographic on EPA’s new bee advisory box:

http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ecosystem/pollinator/bee-label-info-graphic.pdf


EPA Proposes Rule to Modernize Clean Water Act Reporting

E-reporting initiative will increase efficiency, ease burden for states and improve public access to data

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a rule that would modernize Clean Water Act (CWA) reporting processes for hundreds of thousands of municipalities, industries, and other facilities by converting to an electronic data reporting system. The proposed e-reporting rule would make facility-specific information, such as inspection and enforcement history, pollutant monitoring results, and other data required by permits accessible to the public through EPA’s website.

EPA estimates that, once the rule is fully implemented, the 46 states and the Virgin Island Territory that are authorized to administer the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program will collectively save approximately $29 million each year as a result of switching from paper to electronic reporting.

“In addition to dramatically cutting costs for states and other regulatory authorities, the e-reporting rule will substantially expand transparency by making it easier for everyone to quickly access critical data on pollution that may be affecting communities,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “The e-reporting rule will also allow states and other regulatory authorities to focus limited resources on the most serious water quality problems, which will lead to increased compliance, improved water quality, and a level playing field for the regulated community.”
Currently, facilities subject to reporting requirements submit data in paper form to states and other regulatory authorities, where the information must be manually entered into data systems. Through the e-reporting rule, these facilities will electronically report their data directly to the appropriate regulatory authority. EPA expects that the e-reporting rule will lead to more comprehensive and complete data on pollution sources, quicker availability of the data for use, and increased accessibility and transparency of the data to the public.

The CWA requires that municipal, industrial or commercial facilities that discharge wastewater directly into waters of the United States obtain a permit. The NPDES program requires that permitted facilities monitor and report data on pollutant discharges and take other actions to ensure discharges do not affect human health or the environment.

Most facilities subject to reporting requirements will be required to start submitting data electronically one year following the effective date of the final rule. Facilities with limited access to the Internet will have the option of one additional year to come into compliance with the new rule. EPA will work closely with states to provide support to develop or enhance state electronic reporting capabilities.

EPA has already scheduled several webinars in an effort to help states, trade organizations, and other interested parties better understand the details and requirements of the proposed rule. Over the next few months, EPA expects to schedule additional webinar sessions.

The proposed rule will be available for review and public comment for 90 days following the publication date in the Federal Register.

View the proposed rule in the Federal Register: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/07/30/2013-17551/npdes-electronic-reporting-rule

More information on webinars: http://www2.epa.gov/compliance/proposed-npdes-electronic-reporting-rule


EPA Strengthens Chemical Assessment Process to Protect Public Health

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced changes to its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program to improve the scientific foundation of assessments, increase transparency in the program and the process and allow the agency to produce more IRIS assessments each year.  IRIS is a human health assessment program that evaluates information on health effects that may result from exposure to environmental contaminants. These high quality, science-based health assessments are used to inform decisions to protect public health and the environment.

“EPA is committed to producing high quality scientific assessments in a timely and transparent manner,” said Lek Kadeli, principal deputy assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of Research and Development.  “The improvements announced today will further strengthen our IRIS assessments and enable the agency to better protect human health and the environment by completing more health assessments for chemicals that are being used across our country every day.”

Consistent with recommendations from the National Research Council, EPA will now begin releasing preliminary materials and hold a public meeting early in the assessment development process to explain the criteria for selecting studies and to ensure that critical research was not omitted. Meeting with the public earlier in the process will result in more timely opportunities for the public to provide input into the assessment and comment on the information available for each chemical assessed.

EPA is also using a new document structure for IRIS assessments that is clearer, more concise and more systematic to make the information more accessible.  To improve transparency, the agency is enhancing the IRIS website by providing more detailed information regarding assessment schedules, stakeholder meetings and updates on IRIS progress.

Additionally, the agency is implementing “stopping rules” for IRIS that will provide a cut-off point for accepting new data for individual IRIS assessments and raising scientific issues related to the assessment. With these changes, EPA’s goal is to increase the number of assessments being completed each year and provide more accurate assessment development timelines to the public.

The IRIS database contains crucial information about how and at what level chemicals may impact human health.  When combined with exposure information, governments and private entities use IRIS to help characterize the public health risks of chemical substances, thereby supporting risk management decisions designed to protect public health.

More information about IRIS:  http://www.epa.gov/iris

More information about the IRIS process:  http://www.epa.gov/iris/process.htm


Webinar: National Highway Institute: Part 3: Outreach and Discussion on Program Performance Information

August 29, Noon-1:30 PM (EDT) – Part 3: Outreach and Discussion on Program Performance Information

The purpose of this webinar is to gather Transportation Alternatives Program performance information.


Webinar: National Highway Institute: Part 2: TAP Implementation Roundtable Discussion

August 12, Noon-1:30 PM (EDT) – Part 2: TAP Implementation Roundtable Discussion

The purpose of this webinar is to highlight how SDOTs and MPOs have implemented the Transportation Alternatives Program.


Chief University Expands Third Quarter Training Schedule

Source: Body Shop Business News.com

Chief University, the training arm of Chief Automotive Technologies, has added 14 classes to its remaining third quarter schedule, including one new session of its flagship Design Based Repair course.

A total of 26 classes will be taught in August and September at a variety of locations across the U.S. Courses combine classroom learning with hands-on training using recently damaged vehicles.

Most Chief University classes cost $655 and include comprehensive training materials and certificates of completion. Structural Damage Analysis is a three-day course that costs $985. The courses are led by professional Chief certified instructors and approved for I-CAR credit hours through the I-CAR Industry Training Alliance program. Chief training also has been certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) for compliance with the Continuing Automotive Service Education (CASE) Standards.


More information: To register, click here.
The schedule is as follows:

Design Based Repair

Sept. 10-11    Orem, Utah

Computerized Measuring
Aug. 13-14     Charlottesville, Va.
Aug. 20-21     Kansas City, Mo.
Aug. 27-28     Altoona, Pa.
Sept. 10-11    Norwalk, Calif.
Sept. 17-18    Denver, Colo.

Full Frame Analysis & Repair Planning

Aug. 19-20     Collegeville, Pa.
Aug. 22-23     Kansas City, Mo.

Unitized Body Analysis & Planning
Aug. 6-7        Troy, N.Y.
Sept. 19-20   Denver, Colo.

Structural Damage Analysis
Aug. 21-23     Portland, Ore.
Sept. 10-12    Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 24-26    Collegeville, Pa.

Advanced Frame Analysis
Aug. 6-7        Houston, Texas
Aug. 8-9        Walla Walla, Wash.
Aug. 15-16    Charlottesville Va.
Aug. 27-28    St. Louis, Mo.
Sept. 17-18   Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 24-25   Lakewood, Colo.

Estimator/Appraiser
Aug. 6-7        Walla Walla, Wash.
Aug. 8-9        Houston, Texas
Aug. 29-30    St. Louis, Mo.
Sept. 12-13   Norwalk, Calif.
Sept. 12-13   Orem, Utah
Sept. 19-20   Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 26-27   Lakewood, Colo.


EPA Expands List of Safer Chemical Ingredients

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) today added more than 130 chemicals to its Safer Chemical Ingredients List. For the first time, 119 chemicals that use fragrance for commercial and consumer cleaning products have been added to the list.

“Fragrances are an important yet complex part of many consumer cleaning products. By adding fragrance and other chemicals to the Safer Chemical Ingredients List, EPA continues its commitment to help companies make safer products and provide the public with greater access to chemical information,” said James Jones, acting assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The Safer Chemical Ingredients List, which now contains 602 chemicals, serves as a resource for manufacturers interested in making safer products; health and environmental advocates seeking to encourage the use of safer chemicals; and consumers seeking information on the ingredients in safer chemical products.

It also serves as a guide for Design for the Environment (DfE) labeled products, which must meet EPA’s rigorous, scientific standards for protecting human health and the environment.

More than 2,500 products are certified under the DfE Standard for Safer Products including all-purpose cleaners, laundry and dishwasher detergents, window cleaners, car and boat care, and many other products. Using DfE-certified products significantly reduces exposures to chemicals which helps protect families and the environment.

The Safer Chemical Ingredients list was created in September 2012 and EPA continues to update the list with additional fragrances and chemicals.

More on the Safer Chemical Ingredients List: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/saferingredients.htm


BASF Launches Low VOC Solvent-Borne Basecoat System

Source: Body Shop Business News.com

BASF has announced the launch of a new, low volatile organic compound (VOC), fast-dry solvent-borne basecoat system in the U.S. and Canadian markets.

The ONYX HD Low VOC Productive System produces low VOC basecoats that are either waterborne or solvent-borne – the only system currently on the market that provides these options. The system offers similar benefits and performance to national rule solvent-borne basecoat systems, and meets all VOC regulations across North America.

According to the company, the product is easy to spray, offers enhanced de-nibbing, and dries quickly under common humidity and temperature conditions compared to other systems. Several collision repair centers have tested the new system and reported significant decreases in drying times leading to more repairs in less time, which can result in increased profits.

“It’s fabulous stuff to work with,” said Cesi Paglia, a paint technician for Provincial Chrysler in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. “Cars get out of the booth sometimes in 50 percent less time.”

Added Tony Castro, owner of ProCollision in Hialeah, Fla., “ONYX HD Low VOC workability is quicker and faster. The jobs are cleaner, and the end result is perfect. Because this product is formulated to mix perfectly with exempt solvents, my shop is VOC compliant without having to purchase any new or additional water-based spray equipment.”

Antonio Leandres, market segment manager for BASF’s Automotive Refinish business in North America, said, “This new system is a truly unique basecoat that offers our customers options they’ve never had before. A low VOC solution that dries quickly, saves energy, has excellent hiding capabilities, offers easy application and excellent color matching is something that is hugely beneficial and groundbreaking in the refinish market.”


More information:

ONYX HD


National Drug Take Back Event: October 26, 2013.

The DEA website has announced the next National Take-Back Initiative event, October 26, 2013, to collect unwanted household pharmaceuticals. (http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/)

Law enforcement agencies can now call their state/regional DEC “Point of Contact” (POC) agent to register their sites.

POC names and numbers can be found at: (http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/poc.htm)

You can find information about organizing collection events at: http://www.takebacknetwork.com/ and http://www.healthyyouth.org/medication-disposal.php among others.

Note: With the DEA event, only a phone call is needed to set-up a collection site. References to getting state permits would only apply to independent collection events.


Source: Body Shop Business.com

Sherwin-Williams Automotive Finishes has announced its latest courses and training sites for the fourth quarter (October through December), 2013.

Participants will learn through a combination of classroom, digital and hands-on settings at various metropolitan Sherwin-Williams Automotive Finishes training centers. Training is available to all shop owners, managers, painters and technicians.

According to Rod Habel, director of training operations for Sherwin-Williams, many of the new classes directly relate to the Sherwin-Williams philosophy of helping its customers through “lean thinking” – introducing concepts that support sustainable practices, which increases productivity while minimizing or often eliminating waste.

In particular, Habel noted that there will also be considerable curriculum emphasis on the company’s breakthrough AWX Performance Plus waterborne coatings technology as well as its ATX refinish system.

A key sampling of courses also offered during the fourth quarter includes:

  • Color Adjustment and Blending
  • Estimating Solutions for Profit
  • Achieving Service Excellence
  • Express Scratch Repair Service
  • Painter Certification

Further details regarding the 2013 fourth quarter schedule for training centers, dates, specific course descriptions, and locations are listed here.

US EPA, WASHINGTON – In an ongoing effort to protect bees and other pollinators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed new pesticide labels that prohibit use of some neonicotinoid pesticide products where bees are present.

“Multiple factors play a role in bee colony declines, including pesticides. The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action to protect bees from pesticide exposure and these label changes will further our efforts,” said Jim Jones, assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The new labels will have a bee advisory box and icon with information on routes of exposure and spray drift precautions. Today’s announcement affects products containing the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin and thiamethoxam. The EPA will work with pesticide manufacturers to change labels so that they will meet the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) safety standard.

In May, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and EPA released a comprehensive scientific report on honey bee health, showing scientific consensus that there are a complex set of stressors associated with honey bee declines, including loss of habitat, parasites and disease, genetics, poor nutrition and pesticide exposure.

The agency continues to work with beekeepers, growers, pesticide applicators, pesticide and seed companies, and federal and state agencies to reduce pesticide drift dust and advance best management practices. The EPA recently released new enforcement guidance to federal, state and tribal enforcement officials to enhance investigations of beekill incidents.

More on the EPA’s label changes and pollinator protection efforts: http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/ecosystem/pollinator/index.html

View the infographic on EPA’s new bee advisory box:

http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ecosystem/pollinator/bee-label-info-graphic.pdf

E-reporting initiative will increase efficiency, ease burden for states and improve public access to data

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a rule that would modernize Clean Water Act (CWA) reporting processes for hundreds of thousands of municipalities, industries, and other facilities by converting to an electronic data reporting system. The proposed e-reporting rule would make facility-specific information, such as inspection and enforcement history, pollutant monitoring results, and other data required by permits accessible to the public through EPA’s website.

EPA estimates that, once the rule is fully implemented, the 46 states and the Virgin Island Territory that are authorized to administer the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program will collectively save approximately $29 million each year as a result of switching from paper to electronic reporting.

“In addition to dramatically cutting costs for states and other regulatory authorities, the e-reporting rule will substantially expand transparency by making it easier for everyone to quickly access critical data on pollution that may be affecting communities,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “The e-reporting rule will also allow states and other regulatory authorities to focus limited resources on the most serious water quality problems, which will lead to increased compliance, improved water quality, and a level playing field for the regulated community.”
Currently, facilities subject to reporting requirements submit data in paper form to states and other regulatory authorities, where the information must be manually entered into data systems. Through the e-reporting rule, these facilities will electronically report their data directly to the appropriate regulatory authority. EPA expects that the e-reporting rule will lead to more comprehensive and complete data on pollution sources, quicker availability of the data for use, and increased accessibility and transparency of the data to the public.

The CWA requires that municipal, industrial or commercial facilities that discharge wastewater directly into waters of the United States obtain a permit. The NPDES program requires that permitted facilities monitor and report data on pollutant discharges and take other actions to ensure discharges do not affect human health or the environment.

Most facilities subject to reporting requirements will be required to start submitting data electronically one year following the effective date of the final rule. Facilities with limited access to the Internet will have the option of one additional year to come into compliance with the new rule. EPA will work closely with states to provide support to develop or enhance state electronic reporting capabilities.

EPA has already scheduled several webinars in an effort to help states, trade organizations, and other interested parties better understand the details and requirements of the proposed rule. Over the next few months, EPA expects to schedule additional webinar sessions.

The proposed rule will be available for review and public comment for 90 days following the publication date in the Federal Register.

View the proposed rule in the Federal Register: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/07/30/2013-17551/npdes-electronic-reporting-rule

More information on webinars: http://www2.epa.gov/compliance/proposed-npdes-electronic-reporting-rule

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced changes to its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program to improve the scientific foundation of assessments, increase transparency in the program and the process and allow the agency to produce more IRIS assessments each year.  IRIS is a human health assessment program that evaluates information on health effects that may result from exposure to environmental contaminants. These high quality, science-based health assessments are used to inform decisions to protect public health and the environment.

“EPA is committed to producing high quality scientific assessments in a timely and transparent manner,” said Lek Kadeli, principal deputy assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of Research and Development.  “The improvements announced today will further strengthen our IRIS assessments and enable the agency to better protect human health and the environment by completing more health assessments for chemicals that are being used across our country every day.”

Consistent with recommendations from the National Research Council, EPA will now begin releasing preliminary materials and hold a public meeting early in the assessment development process to explain the criteria for selecting studies and to ensure that critical research was not omitted. Meeting with the public earlier in the process will result in more timely opportunities for the public to provide input into the assessment and comment on the information available for each chemical assessed.

EPA is also using a new document structure for IRIS assessments that is clearer, more concise and more systematic to make the information more accessible.  To improve transparency, the agency is enhancing the IRIS website by providing more detailed information regarding assessment schedules, stakeholder meetings and updates on IRIS progress.

Additionally, the agency is implementing “stopping rules” for IRIS that will provide a cut-off point for accepting new data for individual IRIS assessments and raising scientific issues related to the assessment. With these changes, EPA’s goal is to increase the number of assessments being completed each year and provide more accurate assessment development timelines to the public.

The IRIS database contains crucial information about how and at what level chemicals may impact human health.  When combined with exposure information, governments and private entities use IRIS to help characterize the public health risks of chemical substances, thereby supporting risk management decisions designed to protect public health.

More information about IRIS:  http://www.epa.gov/iris

More information about the IRIS process:  http://www.epa.gov/iris/process.htm

August 29, Noon-1:30 PM (EDT) – Part 3: Outreach and Discussion on Program Performance Information

The purpose of this webinar is to gather Transportation Alternatives Program performance information.

August 12, Noon-1:30 PM (EDT) – Part 2: TAP Implementation Roundtable Discussion

The purpose of this webinar is to highlight how SDOTs and MPOs have implemented the Transportation Alternatives Program.

Source: Body Shop Business News.com

Chief University, the training arm of Chief Automotive Technologies, has added 14 classes to its remaining third quarter schedule, including one new session of its flagship Design Based Repair course.

A total of 26 classes will be taught in August and September at a variety of locations across the U.S. Courses combine classroom learning with hands-on training using recently damaged vehicles.

Most Chief University classes cost $655 and include comprehensive training materials and certificates of completion. Structural Damage Analysis is a three-day course that costs $985. The courses are led by professional Chief certified instructors and approved for I-CAR credit hours through the I-CAR Industry Training Alliance program. Chief training also has been certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) for compliance with the Continuing Automotive Service Education (CASE) Standards.


More information: To register, click here.
The schedule is as follows:

Design Based Repair

Sept. 10-11    Orem, Utah

Computerized Measuring
Aug. 13-14     Charlottesville, Va.
Aug. 20-21     Kansas City, Mo.
Aug. 27-28     Altoona, Pa.
Sept. 10-11    Norwalk, Calif.
Sept. 17-18    Denver, Colo.

Full Frame Analysis & Repair Planning

Aug. 19-20     Collegeville, Pa.
Aug. 22-23     Kansas City, Mo.

Unitized Body Analysis & Planning
Aug. 6-7        Troy, N.Y.
Sept. 19-20   Denver, Colo.

Structural Damage Analysis
Aug. 21-23     Portland, Ore.
Sept. 10-12    Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 24-26    Collegeville, Pa.

Advanced Frame Analysis
Aug. 6-7        Houston, Texas
Aug. 8-9        Walla Walla, Wash.
Aug. 15-16    Charlottesville Va.
Aug. 27-28    St. Louis, Mo.
Sept. 17-18   Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 24-25   Lakewood, Colo.

Estimator/Appraiser
Aug. 6-7        Walla Walla, Wash.
Aug. 8-9        Houston, Texas
Aug. 29-30    St. Louis, Mo.
Sept. 12-13   Norwalk, Calif.
Sept. 12-13   Orem, Utah
Sept. 19-20   Windsor, Conn.
Sept. 26-27   Lakewood, Colo.

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) today added more than 130 chemicals to its Safer Chemical Ingredients List. For the first time, 119 chemicals that use fragrance for commercial and consumer cleaning products have been added to the list.

“Fragrances are an important yet complex part of many consumer cleaning products. By adding fragrance and other chemicals to the Safer Chemical Ingredients List, EPA continues its commitment to help companies make safer products and provide the public with greater access to chemical information,” said James Jones, acting assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The Safer Chemical Ingredients List, which now contains 602 chemicals, serves as a resource for manufacturers interested in making safer products; health and environmental advocates seeking to encourage the use of safer chemicals; and consumers seeking information on the ingredients in safer chemical products.

It also serves as a guide for Design for the Environment (DfE) labeled products, which must meet EPA’s rigorous, scientific standards for protecting human health and the environment.

More than 2,500 products are certified under the DfE Standard for Safer Products including all-purpose cleaners, laundry and dishwasher detergents, window cleaners, car and boat care, and many other products. Using DfE-certified products significantly reduces exposures to chemicals which helps protect families and the environment.

The Safer Chemical Ingredients list was created in September 2012 and EPA continues to update the list with additional fragrances and chemicals.

More on the Safer Chemical Ingredients List: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/saferingredients.htm

Source: Body Shop Business News.com

BASF has announced the launch of a new, low volatile organic compound (VOC), fast-dry solvent-borne basecoat system in the U.S. and Canadian markets.

The ONYX HD Low VOC Productive System produces low VOC basecoats that are either waterborne or solvent-borne – the only system currently on the market that provides these options. The system offers similar benefits and performance to national rule solvent-borne basecoat systems, and meets all VOC regulations across North America.

According to the company, the product is easy to spray, offers enhanced de-nibbing, and dries quickly under common humidity and temperature conditions compared to other systems. Several collision repair centers have tested the new system and reported significant decreases in drying times leading to more repairs in less time, which can result in increased profits.

“It’s fabulous stuff to work with,” said Cesi Paglia, a paint technician for Provincial Chrysler in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. “Cars get out of the booth sometimes in 50 percent less time.”

Added Tony Castro, owner of ProCollision in Hialeah, Fla., “ONYX HD Low VOC workability is quicker and faster. The jobs are cleaner, and the end result is perfect. Because this product is formulated to mix perfectly with exempt solvents, my shop is VOC compliant without having to purchase any new or additional water-based spray equipment.”

Antonio Leandres, market segment manager for BASF’s Automotive Refinish business in North America, said, “This new system is a truly unique basecoat that offers our customers options they’ve never had before. A low VOC solution that dries quickly, saves energy, has excellent hiding capabilities, offers easy application and excellent color matching is something that is hugely beneficial and groundbreaking in the refinish market.”


More information:

ONYX HD

The DEA website has announced the next National Take-Back Initiative event, October 26, 2013, to collect unwanted household pharmaceuticals. (http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/)

Law enforcement agencies can now call their state/regional DEC “Point of Contact” (POC) agent to register their sites.

POC names and numbers can be found at: (http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/poc.htm)

You can find information about organizing collection events at: http://www.takebacknetwork.com/ and http://www.healthyyouth.org/medication-disposal.php among others.

Note: With the DEA event, only a phone call is needed to set-up a collection site. References to getting state permits would only apply to independent collection events.