News

News Release: EPA awards $600,000 to Oakland, Calif. health nonprofit to help fight asthma in schools nationwide

CONTACT:   Suzanne Skadowski, 415-972-3165, skadowski.suzanne@epa.gov

RELEASE DATE:   December 17, 2014

 

EPA awards $600,000 to Oakland, Calif. health nonprofit to help fight asthma in schools nationwide 

 

 

SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a $600,000 grant to the Public Health Institute’s Regional Asthma Management & Prevention (RAMP), in Oakland, Calif. to help school-based health centers across the country prevent and manage environmental asthma triggers for children.  Asthma, a chronic respiratory disease that causes the lung’s airways to swell and narrow, leading to wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, is the most common chronic disease among school-aged children.

“Asthma affects over 7 million children in America and over 900,000 children in California,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “EPA’s support for RAMP and its partners advances our commitment to help communities improve indoor air quality to prevent environmental asthma triggers such as dust, mold, smoke and poor ventilation.”

Under EPA’s grant, RAMP and its partner the California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA), will: develop an Asthma Environmental Intervention Guide for school-based health centers nationwide that identifies actions to prevent and manage environmental asthma triggers at school and at home; conduct trainings at state conferences of school-based health centers in California, Michigan, New York, and Connecticut – all states with high asthma prevalence; and convene a national learning collaborative among school-based health centers in California and nationwide.

“Children spend a significant amount of time at school, making schools a very important place to address asthma,” said Anne Kelsey Lamb, RAMP Director. “We look forward to partnering with the EPA, the CSHA, and school-based health centers across the country to collectively improve indoor air quality and reduce the burden of asthma.”

“Reducing exposure to environmental asthma triggers and improving indoor air quality can play a significant role in improving health for students with asthma,” said Kristin Andersen, CSHA Associate Director “We’re so pleased that EPA is giving us an opportunity to partner with RAMP and school-based health centers to do just that.”

RAMP is among eight organizations in the U.S. receiving grants from EPA to reduce risks to public health from indoor air pollution, for a total investment of $4.5 million.

EPA announced the grant award today with RAMP and its partners at LifeLong’s West Oakland Middle School Health Center, one of over 230 school-based health centers in California and 2,000 nationwide that will benefit from the grant project. School-based health centers are clinics typically located on a school campus to provide primary health care for students and families at no or low-cost.

While there is no cure for asthma, with access to medical care, appropriate medications, proper self-management, and prevention of environmental asthma triggers, people can control their symptoms.

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About Regional Asthma Management and Prevention

Regional Asthma Management and Prevention (RAMP), a project of the Public Health Institute, promotes comprehensive strategies for reducing asthma that include clinical management and environmental protection.  www.rampasthma.org The Public Health Institute (PHI) generates and promotes research, leadership and partnerships to build capacity for strong public health programs. www.phi.org/focus-areas/ 

About California School-Based Health Alliance

The California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA) is the statewide nonprofit organization that aims to improve the health and academic success of children and youth by advancing health services in schools. CSHA helps schools and communities put health care where kids are – at school – and our conference, webinars, resources, and technical assistance help school-based health centers offer high quality, age-appropriate care to kids.  Connect with us on Facebook and YouTube: schoolhealthcenters, Twitter: @sbh4ca. http://www.schoolhealthcenters.org/  

About U.S. EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Pacific Southwest Region 9 administers and enforces federal environmental laws in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands and 148 tribal nations — home to more than 48 million people. While great progress has been made to reduce smog, improve water quality, clean up hazardous waste and create sustainable, healthy communities, much work remains to achieve EPA’s goals of protecting our environment and ensuring public health. Connect with us on Twitter: @EPAregion9, Facebook: EPAregion9, and our newsletter: www.epa.gov/region9/newsletter Learn more about our work to fight asthma:http://epa.gov/asthma/ 


News Release: EPA Celebrates 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act

For Immediate Release: December 16, 2014

Media Contact: Nahal Mogharabi, 213-244-1815, Mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov

 

EPA Celebrates 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act

Agency tours small drinking water systems, discusses small system challenges in Coachella Valley

 LOS ANGELES — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). State, local and community representatives joined EPA Regional Administrator at an event held at the San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center in Coachella Valley, Calif.

“Every day more than 38 million Californians rely on clean water for cooking, washing, and bathing,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “We have made incredible progress in improving water quality and are tackling the remaining challenges so that every American will have access to clean drinking water.”

Since 1997, EPA has provided the California Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) more than $1.5 billion for infrastructure projects throughout the state, much of which was used to help disadvantaged communities. EPA works with the California State Water Resources Control Board and other local and state agencies to assist providers who are working with small drinking water systems to enhance their technical, managerial, and financial capability to reliably provide safe drinking water to communities.

Drinking water in the lower Coachella Valley comes from groundwater wells impacted with high levels of naturally-occurring arsenic and chromium. Treatment technologies can be costly, especially for small systems which face unique challenges in financing upgrades and operating needed infrastructure.

Over the past 17 years, Riverside County has received $61 million from the DWSRF for drinking water infrastructure projects including construction of new water treatment plants, drinking water wells, storage tanks and consolidation projects connecting small drinking water systems with larger water districts. In 2008, EPA provided $900,000 in support of the Torres Martinez Tribe for the construction of an intertie with the Coachella Valley Water District due to high arsenic in the Tribe’s primary and backup well.  The project is expected to be completed in late 2015. The new system will service 17 connections for a total population of 53 residents.

As part of the event, Regional Administrator Blumenfeld viewed the water filtration system at the San Jose Community Center which provides drinking water to the center, learning facility and 14 residences. In addition, EPA viewed the point-of-use filtration systems at the Gamez Mobile Home Park. These point-of-use systems are small, individual reverse osmosis filtration units placed under the kitchen sink; each has its own distribution spigot that provides treated drinking water for the home.

More than 290 million people depend on 50,000 community water systems across the country for safe, reliable water every day. The Safe Drinking Water Act was passed by Congress on December 16, 1974. Over the past four decades, the SDWA has enabled EPA and partners to supply safe drinking water to more than 93 percent of the population served by community water systems. EPA has drinking water regulations for more than 90 contaminants, including microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic and organic chemicals and radionuclides. Since the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund was created in 1997, more than $25.8 billion have been provided for more than 10,000 drinking water infrastructure projects nationwide, including drinking water treatment systems, pipes for transmission and distribution of water, and storage.

For more information on the Safe Drinking Water Act, please visit: http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/index.cfm


EPA to Celebrate 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act, Highlight Past Successes and Small System Challenges

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 15, 2014
MEDIA CONTACTS: Nahal Mogharabi, 213-244-1815, Mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov

EPA to Celebrate 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act, Highlight Past Successes and Small System Challenges
Agency tours small drinking water systems at mobile home communities in Coachella Valley

LOS ANGELES – On Tuesday, December 16th, U.S. EPA Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld will be joined by State, local and community representatives at the San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center in Coachella Valley to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Over the past four decades, the SDWA has enabled EPA and partners to supply safe drinking water to more than 93 percent of the population served by community water systems. Following the event, participants will view the water filtration system at the San Jose Community Center which provides safe drinking water to the center, its training facility and 14 residences. Additionally, attendees can view point-of-use filtration systems at the adjacent Gamez Mobile Home Park. These point-of-use systems are small, individual reverse osmosis filtration units placed under the kitchen sink; each has its own distribution spigot that provides treated drinking water for the home.

Drinking water in the lower Coachella Valley comes from groundwater wells impacted with high levels of naturally-occurring arsenic and chromium. Treatment technologies can be costly, especially for small systems which face unique challenges including funding shortfalls and aging infrastructure. Since 1997, EPA has provided more than $1.5 billion to California for their Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program which helps fund infrastructure projects throughout the state. Riverside County has received $61 million from the DWSRF for drinking water infrastructure projects including construction of new water treatment plants, drinking water wells, storage tanks and consolidation projects connecting small drinking water systems with larger water districts.

WHO:   
Jared Blumenfeld, EPA Regional Administrator
Kyle Ochenduszko, Senior Engineer, CA State Water Resources Control Board
Mark L. Johnson, Director of Engineering, Coachella Valley Water District
Sergio Carranza, Executive Director, Pueblo Unido CDC

WHAT:
40th Anniversary to the Safe Drinking Water Act: Successes, Highlights and Challenges Facing Small Drinking Water Systems
Tour Gamez Mobile Home Park

WHEN: 
Tuesday, December 16th
11:30 a.m.
**Media should plan to arrive no later than 11:15 a.m.

WHERE: 
San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center
Event will be held outside of Water Filtration Systems
69-455 Pierce St., Thermal, CA

VISUALS: Media can view the installed water filtration systems at the community center and will also view point-of use filtration systems installed in the Gamez Mobile Park homes.

RSVP REQUIRED: *** Press who would like to attend this event, or for more information please e-mail Nahal Mogharabi, mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov.


EPA Presidential Advisory Committee Issues Report on Ecological Restoration in the U.S. – Mexico Border Region

Posted: December 8, 2014

WASHINGTON – The Good Neighbor Environmental Board today issued its 16th annual report to the president, which examines environmental degradation in the border region and recommends actions the U.S. federal government can take to protect and restore the border environment. Given the severe impacts on natural resources along the U.S. border with Mexico, the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) requested that the Board focus its report on ecological restoration.

The Board is an independent federal advisory committee that develops recommendations to the president on U.S. – Mexico border environment and infrastructure issues. The report, “Ecological Restoration in the U.S. – Mexico Border Region,” was accepted by CEQ on behalf of President Obama.

“The rapid population growth of the region and current environmental conditions in the arid borderlands means we need to build even further on the excellent binational, U.S. federal, Tribal, state and local efforts to resolve environmental degradation,” said Board Chairman Diane Austin. “A more comprehensive approach to ecological restoration throughout the border region will incorporate new, pragmatic initiatives that improve coordination among U.S. agencies and activate engagement among local, state, Tribal and national collaborators on both sides of the international border.”
Read more


New EPA Standards A Big Win for Truckers

Posted: December 8, 2014
Source: JustMeans.com
By: RP Siegel in Energy

In 2010, heavy-duty trucks and buses accounted for 23% of all transportation-related greenhouse gases, even though they comprise less than 5% of all vehicles. In response to this, the Obama administration, in August of 2011, issued a directive, setting a new fuel efficiency targets for heavy duty trucks, starting in 2014 and extending through 2018.

With 2014 being the first year the new standards are in place, the results have been no less than remarkable. Since trucks are primarily used for commercial purposes, businesses are very interested in high efficiency since that contributes directly to their bottom line.

Sales of heavy trucks are soaring. October sales surpassed 22,000 units, the highest since 2006. Overall sales year to date have been running 20% higher than a year ago. Some of that is because buyers waited for the new models to come out. Fuel economy is a big reason why. While a typical tractor-trailer on the road today gets 5.8 mpg, those equipped with the latest engines get as much as 9 mpg. A new demonstration model SuperTruck, has been running up and down the highways, getting over 10 mpg under real world conditions. That’s an increase of 70% in fuel economy. Imagine what that can due to a trucker’s operating cost. Read more


Obama Administration Selects Los Angeles, Calif., Ajo, Ariz. and Fallon, Nev. to Develop Local Food Projects, Encourage Economic Expansion

Posted: December 5, 2014

26 communities selected nationwide for Local Foods, Local Places Initiative

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined to announce 26 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative providing technical support to integrate local food systems into community economic action plans. Over the next two years, the project will aim to increase access to locally grown, healthy fruits and vegetables for residents while boosting economic opportunity for farmers/producers in various areas.

The Youth Policy Institute in Los Angeles, Calif. will receive technical assistance to create a community-supported agriculture program that can improve the health of low-income residents by increasing access to local foods, boost economic opportunities for farmers and producers in the region, and help revitalize distressed neighborhoods.
Read more


U.S. EPA honors 2014 Green Power Leaders

Posted: December 3, 2014

Apple, Google, Intel, 3Degrees Group, Las Vegas among winners nationwide

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency presented its annual Green Power Leadership Awards to 23 businesses and organizations for their efforts to significantly advance the green power market by using electricity from renewable energy including solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, and low-impact hydroelectric sources.

“By using green power, these businesses and organizations are reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts associated with climate change, and protecting public health,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Our partners demonstrate that green power is both accessible and affordable while also growing the renewable energy market.”

EPA presented the awards at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in Sacramento, Calif. The following businesses and organizations in the Pacific Southwest were among the winners nationwide:

On-Site Generation Partner of the Year Read more


EPA Proposes Smog Standards to Safeguard Americans from Air Pollution

Posted: November 26, 2014
Source: EPA

WASHINGTON– Based on extensive recent scientific evidence about the harmful effects of ground-level ozone, or smog, EPA is proposing to strengthen air quality standards to within a range of 65 to 70 parts per billion (ppb) to better protect Americans’ health and the environment, while taking comment on a level as low as 60 ppb. The Clean Air Act requires EPA to review the standards every five years by following a set of open, transparent steps and considering the advice of a panel of independent experts. EPA last updated these standards in 2008, setting them at 75 ppb.

“Bringing ozone pollution standards in line with the latest science will clean up our air, improve access to crucial air quality information, and protect those most at-risk. It empowers the American people with updated air quality information to protect our loved ones – because whether we work or play outdoors – we deserve to know the air we breathe is safe,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “Fulfilling the promise of the Clean Air Act has always been EPA’s responsibility. Our health protections have endured because they’re engineered to evolve, so that’s why we’re using the latest science to update air quality standards – to fulfill the law’s promise, and defend each and every person’s right to clean air.” Read more


U.S. EPA, San Jose, recycler celebrate food waste to energy conversion

Innovative local composting and biogas facility leads the nation

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and City of San Jose will celebrate the city’s successful food-waste-to-energy program at a tour of the nation’s first large-scale commercial anaerobic digestion facility, privately owned and operated by Zero Waste Energy Development Company.

“Thanksgiving is a great time to focus on reducing food waste, the largest single material still going to landfills,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “By turning food scraps into compost and renewable energy, San Jose and Zero Waste Energy Development are helping fight waste and climate change.”

The San Jose compost and biogas program and Zero Waste Energy Development (ZWED) facility supports the city’s goal of achieving zero waste by 2022. The city currently diverts about 74 percent of waste material from landfills through reuse, recycling, composting, and anaerobic digestion.

“Our strong public-private partnership with ZWED exemplifies our bold Green Vision,” said San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed. “We’re diverting waste from our landfill and converting it to energy by collaborating with ZWED at the world’s largest anaerobic digestion facility. This is project is a win-win for our businesses, our community, and the environment.”

During its first ten months of operation in 2014, the ZWED facility has recycled more than 30,000 tons of food scraps from restaurants and grocery stores that would otherwise go to the landfill. This food waste generates 500 kilowatts per hour of electricity that is used to power onsite operations, and it has produced approximately 6,000 tons of compost. The facility is capable of digesting and composting 90,000 tons of organic waste per year and is expected to produce 1.6 megawatts and sell excess power to the grid in early 2015.

“We’re pleased to have the EPA and City of San Jose join in celebrating our first anniversary of the opening of our facility,” said Richard Cristina, president of ZWED. “We’re excited to showcase the tremendous success of our partnership to keep San Jose’s commercial wet waste out of landfills while creating a high quality compost and renewable energy.”

San Jose garbage, recycling and composting systems start with state-of-the-art facilities where all commercial waste is first sorted before anything is sent to the landfill.  Organic and food waste is moved to the ZWED facility, where 16 anaerobic digesters use bacteria to break down the material in an oxygen-depleted environment to create a biogas rich in methane. The gas in turn fuels a combined heat and power plant that generates electricity for adjacent recycling operations.

California recently announced the recipients of $14.5 million in grants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from food and other organic waste going to landfill. Five projects in California will each receive $2.5 to $3 million to expand or develop anaerobic digester or composting facilities similar to San Jose’s.

EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge and new Reducing Wasted Food & Packaging Toolkit encourage businesses and organizations to reduce food waste and help feed people in need.  Participants donated more than 98,000 tons of food and diverted more than 375,000 tons of wasted food from landfills last year, cutting greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to taking 85,000 cars off the road.

Information on today’s tour, photos and more food waste resources:  http://www.epa.gov/region9/mediacenter/ad-sanjose/

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About U.S. EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Pacific Southwest Region 9 administers and enforces federal environmental laws in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands and 148 tribal nations — home to more than 48 million people. It is a diverse, beautiful and productive part of the nation, from the rainforests of Hawaii and the farms of the Central Valley to the thriving economies of the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles and Las Vegas. Nearly 50 million people make their homes and livelihoods across EPA Region 9’s 386,000 square mile-jurisdiction, producing more than $2 trillion in goods and services each year. Over the past four decades, EPA Region 9 has spent billions of dollars and millions of staff hours to maintain and safeguard the air we breathe, the water we drink, the land we treasure. While great progress has been made to reduce smog, improve water quality, clean up hazardous waste and create sustainable, healthy communities, much work remains to achieve EPA’s goals of protecting our environment and ensuring public health. Follow Us: Facebook: EPAregion9, Twitter: @EPAregion9, Newsletter:www.epa.gov/region9/newsletter

About San Jose Environmental Services Department and San Jose Green Vision

San Jose, Capital of Silicon Valley, is the largest city in Northern California and the 10th largest city in the nation. The San Jose Environmental Services Department is responsible for the management of solid waste collection and recycling; watershed protection and pollution prevention; municipal drinking water and recycled water; community sustainability initiatives, and the operation and infrastructure improvements of the San Jose-Santa Clara Regional Wastewater Facility. ESD’s mission is to deliver world class utility services and programs to improve our health, environment, and economy. In collaboration with other City departments and community and business partners, ESD creates innovative projects and initiatives that align with San Jose Green Vision, a long-term comprehensive plan to lead our community into a sustainable future. The Green Vision includes bold goals for clean-tech jobs, reduced energy use, renewable energy, green buildings, waste reduction, water reuse, sustainable development, a clean fleet, more trees, zero emission streetlights, and interconnected trails. www.sjenvironment/greenvision Follow Us: Facebook: SJEnvironment Twitter: @SJEnvironment Instagram: @SJEnvironment Notifications: Receive our news, events, and announcements at Notify Me www.sanjoseca.gov/list.aspx; select keyword Environment and choose from the topics list.

About Zero Waste Energy Development Company LLC

Zero Waste Energy Development Company LLC is a joint venture between GreenWaste Recovery and Zanker Road Resource Management and was formed to develop and operate the first dry fermentation anaerobic digestion facility in the United States. Zero Waste is designing and permitting a 270,000 tons per year Dry Fermentation Anaerobic Digestion Facility in San Jose that will be developed in three phases; each phase will be capable of processing 90,000 tons per year of organic materials. The facility will process and recover energy from source separated food waste and the organic fraction remaining after materials including Municipal Solid Waste are processed at GreenWaste’s Material Recovery Facility and create two products: biogas containing methane and compost. To learn more about ZWEDC visit www.zwedc.com


EPA, DOE Release 2015 Fuel Economy Guide for Car Buyers

Posted: November 6, 2014

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2015 Fuel Economy Guide, providing consumers with a valuable resource to help them choose the most fuel-efficient and low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles that meet their needs.

In comparison to previous years, the 2015 models include a greater number of fuel efficient and low-emission vehicles in a broader variety of classes and sizes.

“Automakers’ innovation is thriving, and Americans are benefiting from new consumer choices that limit carbon emissions and slow the effects of climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “This year’s guide is not just about how the latest models compare with one another; it’s about providing people with an excellent tool so that they can make informed decisions affecting their pocketbooks and the planet.” Read more