All posts tagged EPA

Posted: March 5, 2015

Las Vegas Resorts Lead Zero Waste Efforts in Nevada

LAS VEGAS – MGM Resorts International was recognized today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its outstanding efforts in food recovery.

The entertainment and hospitality company received two national Food Recovery Challenge awards for reducing food waste and, in the process, conserving natural resources.

“MGM’s zero waste leadership has turned mountains of food scraps into compost to help fight waste and climate change,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest.

MGM Resorts and MGM Grand Las Vegas are two of the 32 recipients who received the 2014 Food Recovery Challenge Award, and the only recipients in Nevada. The award was given for achieving the highest percentage of potentially wasted food diversion and prevention.

Senator Harry Reid’s office also issued a certificate of recognition to the company for leading food recovery efforts in Nevada. Officials from the EPA and Sen. Reid’s office presented these honors to MGM Resorts representatives in a ceremony at ARIA Resort & Casino. A behind-the-scenes tour of the resort’s food recovery program was also given. Read more

Posted: February 10, 2015

Awards $3 Million to Reduce Emissions from 76 School Bus Fleets Nationwide

SAN FRANCISCO –Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is awarding five California School Districts $325,000 and one Nevada School District $110,000 to replace eighteen older diesel school buses with new, clean buses that are more than 90 percent cleaner.  Nationwide, 76 recipients will receive rebates through EPA’s Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) funding to replace 210 school buses.

Nevada’s recipient, the Washoe County School District, will replace five school buses.  California recipients will replace four buses in the Town Ride, Inc. of Arcadia Unified School District;  two buses for the Culver City Unified School District, one bus for the Enterprise Elementary School District in Redding, Calif., five buses for the Clovis Unified School District, and one bus for the Southern Humboldt Unified School District in Miranda, Calif. Read more

Jan. 21, 2015

Summary
Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the automotive industry and the states signed an agreement to reduce the use of copper and other materials in motor vehicle brake pads. The Copper-Free Brake Initiative calls for cutting copper in brake pads to less than 5 percent by 2021 and 0.5 percent by 2025. This voluntary initiative also calls for cutting the amount of mercury, lead, cadmium, asbestiform fibers and chromium-6 salts in motor vehicle brake pads. These steps will decrease runoff of these materials from roads into the nation’s streams, rivers and lakes, where these materials can harm fish, amphibians and plants.

By the Numbers

California and Washington have already passed requirements to reduce these materials in brake pads. Prior to their enactment, dust from vehicular braking released an estimated 1.3 million pounds of copper into California’s environment in 2010 and about 250,000 pounds into Washington’s environment in 2011. Estimates for California show copper in urban runoff down as much as 61 percent thanks to changes in brake pad composition.

What They Said

“EPA is proud to partner with the automotive industry and the states to reduce the use of copper in motor vehicle brake pads, which means less of this material running off our roads and into our nation’s waterways,” said Stan Meiburg, acting deputy administrator for EPA. “The environment and public health in our country will benefit from this type of collaboration between the public and private sector.” Read more

Posted: January 28, 2015

Food Recovery Challenge Participants Alone Diverted 370,000 Tons of Wasted Food from Landfills

WASHINGTON — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the accomplishments of organizations and businesses participating in EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge and WasteWise program for reducing their climate footprint, improving efficiency, helping communities and achieving cost savings through waste reduction. These programs save money, protect the environment and feed the hungry.

“In 2013, EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge participants diverted more than 370,000 tons of wasted food from entering landfills or incinerators. Of this total, more than 36,000 tons of food was donated to feed people in need, which equates to nearly 56 million meals,” said Mathy Stanislaus, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. “I commend the efforts of our award winners and encourage others to follow their lead by joining the Food Recovery Challenge. These leaders demonstrate that protecting the environment, saving money and feeding the hungry can go hand in hand.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that wasted food costs America more than $165 billion annually and that the average family of four throws away $1,600 of food each year. The Food Recovery Challenge participants and endorsers, through innovation and hard work, have greatly reduced wasted food. Food pantries, food rescue programs, local food banks, soup kitchens and shelters are benefiting from donations of wholesome and nutritious food — helping feed people, not landfills.

EPA presented 23 awards to Food Recovery Challenge participants and endorsers in two categories: data-driven and narrative. The data-driven award recipients achieved the highest percentage of wasted food diversion and prevention. The narrative award winners excelled in areas of source reduction, leadership, innovation, education and outreach, and endorsement. Read more

Posted: January 14, 2015

WASHINGTON – Similar to previous years, in 2013, most of the toxic chemical waste managed at industrial facilities in the U.S. was not released into the environment, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) annual Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) report. The report, published today, shows that approximately 22 billion pounds— or 84 percent— of the 26 billion pounds of toxic chemical waste were instead managed through the use of preferred practices such as recycling. Of the 4 billion pounds that were disposed of or otherwise released to the environment, 66 percent went to land, 19 percent to air, 5 percent to water, and 10 percent was transferred to other facilities.

From 2012 to 2013, the amount of toxic chemicals managed as waste by the nation’s industrial facilities increased by 4 percent. This increase includes the amount of chemicals recycled, treated, and burned for energy recovery, as well as the amount disposed of or otherwise released into the environment. In TRI, a “release” generally refers to a chemical that is emitted to the air, water, or placed in some type of land disposal. Most of these releases are subject to a variety of regulatory requirements designed to limit human and environmental harm.

“We all have a right to know what toxic chemicals are being used and released into our environment, and what steps companies are taking to reduce their releases to the environment or, better yet, prevent waste from being generated in the first place.” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “The TRI Program tracks this information and makes it accessible to citizens and communities. And I’m pleased to see that TRI data show such a commitment to release reductions and pollution prevention on the part of many industrial facilities.” Read more

Posted: January 8, 2015

WASHINGTON – Today, EPA is taking action to protect consumers from new uses and imports of the harmful chemicals Toluene Diisocyanates (TDI).

These chemicals are currently widely used in residual amounts in the production of polyurethanes and consumer products, such as coatings, elastomers, adhesives, and sealants and can be found in products used in and around homes or schools. Diisocyanates are well known dermal and inhalation sensitizers in the workplace and can cause asthma, lung damage, and in severe cases, death.

The proposed decision would give EPA the opportunity to evaluate the use of, and if necessary, to take action to prohibit or limit all products containing over 0.1 percent of the chemical including imported products that make their way into the United States.

EPA’s proposed action, a Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), would require manufacturers (including importers) to notify EPA at least 90 days before starting or resuming new uses of these chemicals in consumer products at levels above 0.1 percent by weight.  EPA would then have the opportunity to evaluate the intended use of the chemicals and, if necessary, take action to prohibit or limit the activity.

Additional information on the proposed SNUR on TDI and related compounds and how to provide comments can be found at:  http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/actionplans/tdi.html

CONTACT:   Suzanne Skadowski, 415-972-3165, skadowski.suzanne@epa.gov

RELEASE DATE:   December 17, 2014

 

EPA awards $600,000 to Oakland, Calif. health nonprofit to help fight asthma in schools nationwide 

 

 

SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a $600,000 grant to the Public Health Institute’s Regional Asthma Management & Prevention (RAMP), in Oakland, Calif. to help school-based health centers across the country prevent and manage environmental asthma triggers for children.  Asthma, a chronic respiratory disease that causes the lung’s airways to swell and narrow, leading to wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, is the most common chronic disease among school-aged children.

“Asthma affects over 7 million children in America and over 900,000 children in California,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “EPA’s support for RAMP and its partners advances our commitment to help communities improve indoor air quality to prevent environmental asthma triggers such as dust, mold, smoke and poor ventilation.”

Under EPA’s grant, RAMP and its partner the California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA), will: develop an Asthma Environmental Intervention Guide for school-based health centers nationwide that identifies actions to prevent and manage environmental asthma triggers at school and at home; conduct trainings at state conferences of school-based health centers in California, Michigan, New York, and Connecticut – all states with high asthma prevalence; and convene a national learning collaborative among school-based health centers in California and nationwide.

“Children spend a significant amount of time at school, making schools a very important place to address asthma,” said Anne Kelsey Lamb, RAMP Director. “We look forward to partnering with the EPA, the CSHA, and school-based health centers across the country to collectively improve indoor air quality and reduce the burden of asthma.”

“Reducing exposure to environmental asthma triggers and improving indoor air quality can play a significant role in improving health for students with asthma,” said Kristin Andersen, CSHA Associate Director “We’re so pleased that EPA is giving us an opportunity to partner with RAMP and school-based health centers to do just that.”

RAMP is among eight organizations in the U.S. receiving grants from EPA to reduce risks to public health from indoor air pollution, for a total investment of $4.5 million.

EPA announced the grant award today with RAMP and its partners at LifeLong’s West Oakland Middle School Health Center, one of over 230 school-based health centers in California and 2,000 nationwide that will benefit from the grant project. School-based health centers are clinics typically located on a school campus to provide primary health care for students and families at no or low-cost.

While there is no cure for asthma, with access to medical care, appropriate medications, proper self-management, and prevention of environmental asthma triggers, people can control their symptoms.

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About Regional Asthma Management and Prevention

Regional Asthma Management and Prevention (RAMP), a project of the Public Health Institute, promotes comprehensive strategies for reducing asthma that include clinical management and environmental protection.  www.rampasthma.org The Public Health Institute (PHI) generates and promotes research, leadership and partnerships to build capacity for strong public health programs. www.phi.org/focus-areas/ 

About California School-Based Health Alliance

The California School-Based Health Alliance (CSHA) is the statewide nonprofit organization that aims to improve the health and academic success of children and youth by advancing health services in schools. CSHA helps schools and communities put health care where kids are – at school – and our conference, webinars, resources, and technical assistance help school-based health centers offer high quality, age-appropriate care to kids.  Connect with us on Facebook and YouTube: schoolhealthcenters, Twitter: @sbh4ca. http://www.schoolhealthcenters.org/  

About U.S. EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Pacific Southwest Region 9 administers and enforces federal environmental laws in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands and 148 tribal nations — home to more than 48 million people. While great progress has been made to reduce smog, improve water quality, clean up hazardous waste and create sustainable, healthy communities, much work remains to achieve EPA’s goals of protecting our environment and ensuring public health. Connect with us on Twitter: @EPAregion9, Facebook: EPAregion9, and our newsletter: www.epa.gov/region9/newsletter Learn more about our work to fight asthma:http://epa.gov/asthma/ 

For Immediate Release: December 16, 2014

Media Contact: Nahal Mogharabi, 213-244-1815, Mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov

 

EPA Celebrates 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act

Agency tours small drinking water systems, discusses small system challenges in Coachella Valley

 LOS ANGELES — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). State, local and community representatives joined EPA Regional Administrator at an event held at the San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center in Coachella Valley, Calif.

“Every day more than 38 million Californians rely on clean water for cooking, washing, and bathing,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “We have made incredible progress in improving water quality and are tackling the remaining challenges so that every American will have access to clean drinking water.”

Since 1997, EPA has provided the California Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) more than $1.5 billion for infrastructure projects throughout the state, much of which was used to help disadvantaged communities. EPA works with the California State Water Resources Control Board and other local and state agencies to assist providers who are working with small drinking water systems to enhance their technical, managerial, and financial capability to reliably provide safe drinking water to communities.

Drinking water in the lower Coachella Valley comes from groundwater wells impacted with high levels of naturally-occurring arsenic and chromium. Treatment technologies can be costly, especially for small systems which face unique challenges in financing upgrades and operating needed infrastructure.

Over the past 17 years, Riverside County has received $61 million from the DWSRF for drinking water infrastructure projects including construction of new water treatment plants, drinking water wells, storage tanks and consolidation projects connecting small drinking water systems with larger water districts. In 2008, EPA provided $900,000 in support of the Torres Martinez Tribe for the construction of an intertie with the Coachella Valley Water District due to high arsenic in the Tribe’s primary and backup well.  The project is expected to be completed in late 2015. The new system will service 17 connections for a total population of 53 residents.

As part of the event, Regional Administrator Blumenfeld viewed the water filtration system at the San Jose Community Center which provides drinking water to the center, learning facility and 14 residences. In addition, EPA viewed the point-of-use filtration systems at the Gamez Mobile Home Park. These point-of-use systems are small, individual reverse osmosis filtration units placed under the kitchen sink; each has its own distribution spigot that provides treated drinking water for the home.

More than 290 million people depend on 50,000 community water systems across the country for safe, reliable water every day. The Safe Drinking Water Act was passed by Congress on December 16, 1974. Over the past four decades, the SDWA has enabled EPA and partners to supply safe drinking water to more than 93 percent of the population served by community water systems. EPA has drinking water regulations for more than 90 contaminants, including microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic and organic chemicals and radionuclides. Since the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund was created in 1997, more than $25.8 billion have been provided for more than 10,000 drinking water infrastructure projects nationwide, including drinking water treatment systems, pipes for transmission and distribution of water, and storage.

For more information on the Safe Drinking Water Act, please visit: http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/index.cfm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 15, 2014
MEDIA CONTACTS: Nahal Mogharabi, 213-244-1815, Mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov

EPA to Celebrate 40th Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act, Highlight Past Successes and Small System Challenges
Agency tours small drinking water systems at mobile home communities in Coachella Valley

LOS ANGELES – On Tuesday, December 16th, U.S. EPA Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld will be joined by State, local and community representatives at the San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center in Coachella Valley to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Over the past four decades, the SDWA has enabled EPA and partners to supply safe drinking water to more than 93 percent of the population served by community water systems. Following the event, participants will view the water filtration system at the San Jose Community Center which provides safe drinking water to the center, its training facility and 14 residences. Additionally, attendees can view point-of-use filtration systems at the adjacent Gamez Mobile Home Park. These point-of-use systems are small, individual reverse osmosis filtration units placed under the kitchen sink; each has its own distribution spigot that provides treated drinking water for the home.

Drinking water in the lower Coachella Valley comes from groundwater wells impacted with high levels of naturally-occurring arsenic and chromium. Treatment technologies can be costly, especially for small systems which face unique challenges including funding shortfalls and aging infrastructure. Since 1997, EPA has provided more than $1.5 billion to California for their Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program which helps fund infrastructure projects throughout the state. Riverside County has received $61 million from the DWSRF for drinking water infrastructure projects including construction of new water treatment plants, drinking water wells, storage tanks and consolidation projects connecting small drinking water systems with larger water districts.

WHO:   
Jared Blumenfeld, EPA Regional Administrator
Kyle Ochenduszko, Senior Engineer, CA State Water Resources Control Board
Mark L. Johnson, Director of Engineering, Coachella Valley Water District
Sergio Carranza, Executive Director, Pueblo Unido CDC

WHAT:
40th Anniversary to the Safe Drinking Water Act: Successes, Highlights and Challenges Facing Small Drinking Water Systems
Tour Gamez Mobile Home Park

WHEN: 
Tuesday, December 16th
11:30 a.m.
**Media should plan to arrive no later than 11:15 a.m.

WHERE: 
San Jose Community and Bea Main Learning Center
Event will be held outside of Water Filtration Systems
69-455 Pierce St., Thermal, CA

VISUALS: Media can view the installed water filtration systems at the community center and will also view point-of use filtration systems installed in the Gamez Mobile Park homes.

RSVP REQUIRED: *** Press who would like to attend this event, or for more information please e-mail Nahal Mogharabi, mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov.

Posted: December 5, 2014

26 communities selected nationwide for Local Foods, Local Places Initiative

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined to announce 26 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative providing technical support to integrate local food systems into community economic action plans. Over the next two years, the project will aim to increase access to locally grown, healthy fruits and vegetables for residents while boosting economic opportunity for farmers/producers in various areas.

The Youth Policy Institute in Los Angeles, Calif. will receive technical assistance to create a community-supported agriculture program that can improve the health of low-income residents by increasing access to local foods, boost economic opportunities for farmers and producers in the region, and help revitalize distressed neighborhoods.
Read more